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We're 50 days old! It's kind of surprising, at least to me; I didn't know we'd get so far. We've seen both good content and bad content, as anyone who's checked out meta knows. We're trying to keep quality high. We've certainly seen plenty of highly-upvoted posts, but it's easy for really good posts to get lost beneath them. Therefore, I'm proposing that we reward some of the best (perhaps unappreciated or underappreciated) answers we've gotten so far . . . with bounties.

The rules:

  • Write an answer to this post with a link to the answer you're nominating and a short paragraph explaining why the answer is one of the best. Only nominate one answer in each meta answer.
  • The answer must have been written prior to 8/14/2017, 0:00 UTC.
  • No self-nominations allowed! Let's try to be generous to other people.
  • The meta nomination answer with the most upvotes - not net score, but upvotes - wins. The score of the actual answer does not matter; remember, some of the best answers may have gone unnoticed.
  • The #1 answer will get a bounty of +300, the #2 answer will get a bounty of +200, and the #3 answer will get a bounty of +100. I'm willing to put up some of that rep.
  • Voting ends on 8/24/17, 0:00 UTC.

May the best answer win!


Notes:

  • The bounty amounts can change; I'll take suggestions about that and other miscellaneous rules modifications.
  • If you want to offer additional bounties, go ahead!
  • I'd be interested in doing this again once we hit the 100 day mark. That might provide incentive for people to write even better answers.

Related links:


Results

First place: Stilez's answer to How can I remind someone to do a task when reminding them makes them less likely to do it?.

Second place: David Mulder's answer to Dealing with people who always try to prove you wrong in a conversation.

Third place: NO third submission.

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    Also related on Mi Yodeya: first quarterly contest (we're up to #4 now; see the tag for more). – Monica Cellio Aug 15 '17 at 4:00
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    Just the thing to boost morale, great idea. – apaul Aug 15 '17 at 4:11
  • I'd be happy to throw some unicorn dollars into the pot, how do we go about this? Is it a matter of waiting till winners are picked and throwing one of them a bounty? – apaul Aug 15 '17 at 4:14
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    @apaul34208 Yep! We (mods) are planning to award the top three posts but feel free to add your own afterwards or award runners up. – Catija Aug 15 '17 at 4:25
  • @Catija Awesome! Very generous of you all. I'm looking forward to seeing the nominees. – apaul Aug 15 '17 at 4:27
  • Oh snap. Nice of y'all to do this :) – Zizouz212 Aug 15 '17 at 5:34
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    I notice that each of these answers has gotten a downvote within a short span. Remember, downvotes won't be counted. If you don't want a post to win a bounty, explain in comments; convince other people why an answer is or isn't good. – HDE 226868 Aug 16 '17 at 1:07
  • What's the logic for not counting downvotes? – curiousdannii Aug 16 '17 at 1:34
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    @curiousdannii Voting down requires more reputation, so not everyone who might be interested in this can do so, which effectively gives some users a louder voice than others. Ignoring downvotes negates this. If it introduces some other issues, I can't think of them. Feel free to make an argument for counting them if you have one, though. I don't think we will change this one but we might change future ones if we hear a good explanation. – Catija Aug 16 '17 at 5:46
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    @curiousdannii i thought another reason for not counting down-votes was pretty good. if only up-votes are counted, there's no way to inflict a negative self-interest. Maybe you (not you, mind you) have made friends with one of the candidates; maybe you favor them from answers and interactions on another SE site. This way, all you can do is vote one time for that person – as opposed to that and down-voting the others. – WeaselADAPT Aug 21 '17 at 2:36
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    Wouldnt it be better to reward high quality questions rather than answers. We dont have a problem with not enough good answers. – BACKPFEIFENGESICHT Aug 24 '17 at 18:23
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    @Chad There's no easy way to reward good questions, thus removing the incentive to nominate them except a virtual pat on the back. – Bradley Wilson Aug 24 '17 at 20:11
  • Nominated questions are likely to receive more attention and thus more rep, and better shot at good answers. heck even adding a good bounty to the question is a reward since good answers to their question is a reward in itself. – BACKPFEIFENGESICHT Aug 24 '17 at 20:14
  • @Chad I think we do have a problem with good answers; this should be doubly evident given that there are very few nominations here. That said, you're perfectly welcome to offer bounties of your own for good questions. – HDE 226868 Aug 24 '17 at 20:15
  • @HDE226868 I think we do have a problem with good answers - What is the problem that we are facing? Are good answers not being rewarded with votes? or is it that there are not good answers coming? If its the latter I suspect the problem is more that there are not enough good questions to answer – BACKPFEIFENGESICHT Aug 24 '17 at 20:19
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I nominate @Stilez's answer to How can I remind someone to do a task when reminding them makes them less likely to do it?

Why?

Because not only has he given his personal overview of the situation, but he also provided the perspective of the other side of the coin, in regards to being similar to the person the OP is asking about.

He also goes into great detail as to why you should respond, how you should respond and how he goes about helping himself in this situation (with an image, just for completeness).


It's a great answer all round and should be awarded as such (as SQB has already done so with +50 bounty). These are the kind of answers that stand out to me, out of all the answers I've seen this was instantly the first one that came to mind when seeing this meta post.

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David Mulder's answer to Dealing with people who always try to prove you wrong in a conversation, unlike other answers, does't just stop at "how to respond", but actually goes a bit deep and explains why certain people behave in the said way, and bases his answer on his personal experience being one such person.

Even other answerers point to his answer for further reading.

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