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Depression is a mental-health problem. However, mental-health issues aren't limited to depression.

At IPS, we use both tags:

Today, I added the tag "mental-health" to a question that already had the "depression" tag. However, I'm a bit bother by this redundancy.

So, should we do something (what?) about this? Should we stop using the "mental-health" tag and use a more descriptive tag instead? Would that even be possible for every case?

Am I just over thinking this and see problems where there is none?

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I don't understand why there would be an issue.

I don't see a problem with both (or more) tags existing, but they shouldn't necessarily be on the same questions. If a question is already tagged with a more specific label (like depression) then it shouldn't need the more general mental-health tag in most situations.

There are probably cases where the mental-health tag is as specific as we can get, or is simply more appropriate for the question (whether or not a more specific diagnosis exists).

I can't say for certain without seeing the actual question, but it was probably not necessary to add mental-health to it.

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  • Tags are used to search question (at least, you can use it that way). If I'm looking at "mental-health" questions, chance are I would also be interested in "depression" questions. In this case, shouldn't the question be tagged with both?
    – Ael
    Mar 12 '19 at 14:17
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    @Ælis That's a sensible question, but if that's the case then having both tags is not redundant and so there would not be an issue using both. But I don't think it's the case that interest in tags is transferrable in that way-- someone looking at mental-health might be very interested in depression as well, or not at all. In the former case, the tag to look at is depression, and in the latter case depression results are not desired. In cases where users think that there might be crossover interest, then using both tags perfectly addresses the issue.
    – Upper_Case
    Mar 12 '19 at 14:24
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    @Ælis I'd add that generally speaking (on a UX POV), people tend to use tags that best match their issues and then use broader tags to increase their chances of finding information. Considering this, people would firstly look for depression and if not successful, consider searching mental-health questions.
    – avazula
    Mar 21 '19 at 12:00
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We could edit the tag with the following description:

If your post is specifically related to depression, you may want to use the instead.

But that doesn't cover the other mental health specificities like bipolar disorder (didn't find any related tag), anorexia, eating disorders, ocd ... I struggle to see the interest of linking mental health to depression and not doing the same for all the other troubles.

If the question is solely about depression there's no need to add the tag. If you're unsure, I'd suggest you to ask OP, because mental health is a delicate topic and you can't know what's going on in their lives.

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