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In this tag wiki excerpt I wrote

Asperger syndrome (AS), also known as Asperger's, is a developmental disorder characterized by significant difficulties in social interaction and nonverbal communication, along with restricted and repetitive patterns of behavior and interests. Since this affects the scope of interpersonal skills to be used, use this tag for questions dealing with social situations where asperger's is playing a role.

What Robert Cartaino Rejected as:

Simply defining what a [tag] is rarely helps those using it unless the tag's name itself is ambiguous. Excerpts should describe why and when a tag should be used. See the help center for more guidance.

I dont really get, how it is not fulfilling that specification, can anyone help me out?

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1. It's plagiarized.

The first sentence of that text is taken verbatim from the first sentence of the Wikipedia article on Asperger syndrome. You did not attribute (i.e. give credit to the source) the text in your tag; therefore, you violated Wikipedia's copyright on that text. As Catija reminded me, you can't even attribute this because of one technical limitation: It's not possible to put links in tag wiki excerpts.

2. It's not helpful.

In maybe 80% of cases[citation needed], the person considering a tag knows what the tag means. If you're asking a question about Asperger syndrome, you already know what that is. You don't need to fully define the term.

Usage is what's important. Is the tag for situations involving discussing Asperger syndrome? Is it for situations where one person has Asperger syndrome? Is it for something else entirely? Your second sentence sort of gets at that, but not really very well.

Given that the first sentence is unacceptable, it seems reasonable to reject the edit.

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    And since links aren't possible in excerpts, general guidance is that they should always contain original content. – Catija Jun 28 '17 at 22:21
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    Even if you can't make a link you can always add "(Wikipedia)" – curiousdannii Jun 29 '17 at 5:54

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